New CDC Guidelines: People at Risk Should Consider PrEP

New CDC Guidelines: People at Risk Should Consider PrEP

Health care providers should advise people at "substantial risk" about pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to prevent HIV infection, according to new guidelines issued today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The FDA approved Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) for PrEP in July 2012.

"HIV infection is preventable, yet every year we see some 50,000 new HIV infections in the United States," said CDC Director Tom Frieden. "PrEP, used along with other prevention strategies, has the potential to help at-risk individuals protect themselves and reduce new HIV infections in the United States."

The guidelines, available online, say PrEP should be considered for the following HIV-negative people:

  • Anyone who is in an ongoing sexual relationship with an HIV-positive partner.
  • A gay or bisexual man who has had sex without a condom or has been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection within the past six months, and is not in a mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who recently tested HIV-negative.
  • A heterosexual man or woman who does not always use condoms when having sex with partners known to be at risk for HIV (for example, injecting drug users or bisexual male partners of unknown HIV status), and is not in a mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who recently tested HIV-negative.
  • Anyone who has, within the past six months, injected illicit drugs and shared equipment or been in a treatment program for injection drug use.

This excerpt was cross-posted with the permission of BETAblog.org. Read the full article.