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Share Your Vision

Exhibition at Artists Space 38 Greene Street, 3rd Floor, New York City

October 22 - November 1, 2003
Opening Reception at Artists Space: Wednesday, October 22, 6:00 - 9:00 PM


Share Your Vision

Exhibition

Share Your Vision is a national art contest and exhibition, sponsored by Visual AIDS with funding from Roche. The Share Your Vision program was created to help raise awareness of the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis on the lives of people with HIV. CMV retinitis is an AIDS-related opportunistic infection, which, if left untreated, can lead to blindness. The contest was open to all HIV-positive artists who have been affected by or touched by CMV retinitis. The submission deadline was June 16, 2003 and the contest is now closed. Artists were encouraged to submit work that address, discuss or represent the artist's understanding of and/or experience with CMV retinitis. Selected works will be displayed in an exhibition at Artists Space and included in an accompanying exhibition catalogue. The jury selected 21 artists to be exhibited. The exhibition at Artists Space (38 Greene Street in New York City) will run from October 22 - November 1, 2003 with an opening reception on Wednesday, October 22, 6:00-9:00PM.

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Competition

The Share Your Vision art contest is now closed (deadline: June 16, 2003). All artists who participated in the Share Your Vision art contest will be contacted by mail August 31, 2003. Due to the limited resources and staff at Visual AIDS, please do not call regarding exhibition selection prior to this date. Selected artists will be publicly announced at the exhibition opening: October 22, 2003.

The Share Your Vision jury is: Dr. Ellen Birenbaum, Medical Director of The Robert Mapplethorpe Residential Treatment Facility at Beth Israel Medical Center; Debra Singer, Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art; Moukhtar Kocache, Director of Visual & Media Arts, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council; Yona Backer, Program Officer, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; and Ernesto Pujol, Artist.

The selected artworks will be exhibited at Artists Space and included in the exhibition catalogue. Each of the selected artists will be awarded a cash prize, and for the top 13, a matching gift will also be donated to an HIV/AIDS charitable 501(c)(3) research or support organization of the winner's choice.

 

Cash Awards to Winners
First: $7500
Second: $5000
Third: $3500
Ten Awards of Merit: $2500
Eight Honorable Mentions: $500
(cash prize to artist only)

Matching Gift to HIV/AIDS Charity
First: $7500
Second: $5000
Third: $3500
Ten Awards of Merit: $2500

 


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CMV Retinitis

Cytomegalovirus or CMV is a virus that is acquired by many or most in early adulthood. The mechanism by which we get it is often not clear and it usually causes no symptoms. It is simply there and usually stays in the body for the rest of a person's life without ever causing trouble. When the immune defenses are down, the virus may cause infection and the infection may be almost anyplace: the eye, the brain, the esophagus, the bowel or the lung. In patients with HIV infection with severe suppression of the immune status, CMV often causes infection in the back of the eye or the retina, resulting in CMV retinitis. This causes changes in vision and may actually lead to blindness in the absence of adequate treatment. The diagnosis is made when the patient complains of decreased vision and the physician does an eye exam with an ophthalmoscope to see very characteristic changes. There may be CMV retinitis in one eye or in both eyes. There are two methods of treatment and both are important: The first is drugs directed against CMV that stop progression but usually do not improve vision. The second treatment is to refurbish the immune system so that it can better control CMV. The drugs directed against CMV must be given until the immune system recovers, but when it does, the CMV drug can be stopped and there is usually no progression.

John G. Bartlett, M.D.
Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

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Campaign

The selected artworks may also be utilized by Roche, Visual AIDS or a designee of these parties for a public education campaign on CMV retinitis that may include a traveling exhibition. The artwork may be reproduced for use in the development of collateral materials (print, broadcast and/or Web) to support CMV awareness.

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