Why People With HIV Are Building Networks to Fight Stigma

Why People With HIV Are Building Networks to Fight Stigma

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In the early days of the HIV epidemic, being connected to a network of other people living with HIV was the norm after an HIV diagnosis. Though many networks that thrived at that time began to dwindle in the era of effective HIV meds and accessible HIV service organizations, the need to gather the collective power of people living with HIV has not waned.

In the early days of the HIV epidemic, being connected to a network of other people living with HIV was the norm after an HIV diagnosis. Though many networks that thrived at that time began to dwindle in the era of effective HIV meds and accessible HIV service organizations, the need to gather the collective power of people living with HIV has not waned.

In recent years, large national networks of people living with HIV such as the SERO Project, Positive Women's Network-USA (PWN-USA) and the U.S. People Living with HIV Caucus, have flourished; and smaller networks are on the rise and growing across the U.S.

Why is it so vital for people living with HIV to connect with networks? Here, people living with HIV across the U.S. shared the impact of networks in their community as they move forward against HIV stigma and discrimination.