Growing Older With HIV: What Concerns You Most?

Growing Older With HIV: What Concerns You Most?

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By the year 2015, the majority of people living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. will be age 50 and older -- due to the longer lives brought by modern HIV treatment, and to the fact that one in six new diagnoses of HIV is an older adult. Growing older is a vexing prospect for many people as it is, and living with HIV, or receiving an HIV diagnosis, can bring a host of complexities to this life phase.

By the year 2015, the majority of people living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. will be age 50 and older -- due to the longer lives brought by modern HIV treatment, and to the fact that one in six new diagnoses of HIV is an older adult. Growing older is a vexing prospect for many people as it is, and living with HIV, or receiving an HIV diagnosis, can bring a host of complexities to this life phase.

As the length of life among people living with HIV expands, what are community members' worries about the quality of those lives? We asked this question at conferences and via our weekly newsletter; the responses trace paths to advocacy for a wide range of increased support for older adults living with HIV.