Eight HIV-Positive Folks Talk (Anonymously) About Why They Stay in the HIV Closet

Eight HIV-Positive Folks Talk (Anonymously) About Why They Stay in the HIV Closet

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Disclosing one's HIV status in the workplace or in traditional and social media can have its pros and cons. It can make us feel freer and more empowered and help reduce societal HIV stigma -- but in many places, it can still put us at risk for discrimination and emotional (even perhaps physical) harm. Here's why eight very HIV-positive folks out there in the U.S. choose not to disclose to anyone but close family, friends, and lovers -- even as some of them say they want to go public!

Transcripts have been lightly edited for clarity.

Tim Murphy has been living with HIV since 2000 and writing about HIV activism, science and treatment since 1994. He writes for and has been a staffer at POZ, and writes for the New York Times, New York Magazine, Out Magazine, The Advocate, Details and many other publications. He is also the author of the NYC AIDS-era novel Christodora.

Image Credit: DavidYu for iStock via Thinkstock

Disclosing one's HIV status in the workplace or in traditional and social media can have its pros and cons. It can make us feel freer and more empowered and help reduce societal HIV stigma -- but in many places, it can still put us at risk for discrimination and emotional (even perhaps physical) harm. Here's why eight very HIV-positive folks out there in the U.S. choose not to disclose to anyone but close family, friends, and lovers -- even as some of them say they want to go public!

Transcripts have been lightly edited for clarity.

Tim Murphy has been living with HIV since 2000 and writing about HIV activism, science and treatment since 1994. He writes for and has been a staffer at POZ, and writes for the New York Times, New York Magazine, Out Magazine, The Advocate, Details and many other publications. He is also the author of the NYC AIDS-era novel Christodora.

Image Credit: DavidYu for iStock via Thinkstock