Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

International News

Prevention, Treatment Both Important in Fight Against HIV/AIDS, Brazilian Official Tells U.N. Population Meeting

April 8, 2005

Prevention and treatment efforts are both important in the fight against HIV/AIDS, Dr. Paulo Teixeira, a senior consultant for Brazil's National STD/AIDS Programme in the country's Ministry of Health, said on Thursday at a weeklong, annual meeting of the U.N. Commission on Population and Development in New York, the U.N. News Service reports (U.N. News Service, 4/7). The theme of the session -- which began April 4 and is expected to end Friday -- is population, development and HIV/AIDS, with a focus on poverty (Deen, Inter Press Service, 4/6). Teixeira called for an end to the competing strategies, saying that a "false dilemma" between prevention and treatment has caused "unnecessary losses" and "wasted precious time," according to the U.N. News Service. He added that all countries that have been successful in controlling their HIV/AIDS epidemics have policies that promote condom use (U.N. News Service, 4/7). "Based on international experiences, today there is no evidence whatsoever that moral recommendations, such as abstinence and fidelity, have any impact that might prevent infection and curb the epidemic," he said, adding, "We are aware that the promotion of safer sex involves serious cultural, ethical and religious matters, but we cannot allow them to become a barrier for prevention." Brazil -- which is among the world's "most successful" developing nations in combating its HIV/AIDS epidemic -- has an AIDS prevalence rate of less than 0.6% of the population, Reuters reports (Arieff, Reuters, 4/6).

Recommendations
"We need a global strategy that takes into account the AIDS epidemic in all actions to promote development and to fight poverty, including economic adjustment plans and foreign debt relief," Teixeira said. In addition to current policies and funding, a "much greater effort" is needed within individual countries and worldwide to slow the spread of the disease, treat HIV-positive people and "minimize" the impact of HIV/AIDS on populations, he said, the U.N. News Service reports. According to Teixeira, some of the issues that require immediate attention include lowering the costs of antiretroviral drugs, providing universal and access at no cost to the drugs to aid compliance and regulation of treatment and reducing women's vulnerability to the disease by implementing the Programme of Action adopted at the 1994 U.N. International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, Egypt, to allow access to reproductive health services (U.N. News Service, 4/7).

Back to other news for April 8, 2005


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2004 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More HIV News
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement