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U.S. News

Roche, Trimeris Seek FDA Approval to Use Needle-Free Injection Device to Administer Antiretroviral Fuzeon

July 19, 2005

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Pharmaceutical companies Roche and Trimeris on Monday announced they have filed for FDA approval to use a needle-free injection device to administer the antiretroviral drug Fuzeon, the AP/Forbes.com reports. The Biojector 2000 injection system, which is manufactured by Bioject Medical Technologies, uses power from a CO2 cartridge to spread liquid medication through the skin. The device has been available since 1996 and is used to administer subcutaneous and intramuscular medications. Fuzeon, which is a fusion inhibitor, currently is approved for use with a needle and syringe. The companies said they expect FDA to make a decision on the application later this year. Roche and Trimeris also announced plans to test patient acceptance of the device in a clinical trial, called the Fuzeon Wand study (AP/Forbes.com, 7/18).

Back to other news for July 19, 2005


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2004 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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