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Commentary & Opinion

Brazil's Rejection of U.S. AIDS Funding to Protest Condemnation of Commercial Sex Work "Sensible," Editorial Says

May 10, 2005

Brazil's rejection of $40 million in U.S. AIDS grants because of a Bush administration requirement that HIV/AIDS organizations seeking funding to provide services in other countries must pledge to oppose commercial sex work is "sensible and humane," a Sacramento Bee editorial says (Sacramento Bee, 5/7). Brazilian officials last week said that the country has refused $40 million in U.S. AIDS grants because the pledge requirement would hinder the country's efforts to fight the disease. Under the policy, even groups whose HIV/AIDS work in other countries has nothing to do with commercial sex workers have to make a written pledge opposing commercial sex work or risk losing funding. In addition, the Bush administration could refuse to fund HIV/AIDS groups that do not accept Bush's social agenda on issues such as sexual abstinence and drug use. The new policy stems from two 2003 laws, one involving HIV/AIDS funding and another regarding sex trafficking (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 5/2). Brazil's national HIV/AIDS program encourages abstinence and sexual fidelity but also provides safe-sex education, distributes condoms and offers antiretroviral drugs to any HIV-positive individual, according to the Bee. Although some U.S. residents "insist on a moral litmus test for those receiving U.S. assistance," Pedro Chequer -- director of Brazil's AIDS program and chair of the national commission that decided to refuse the grants -- "has a point" that the country's program cannot operate under "theological, fundamentalist and Shiite" principles, the editorial says. HIV-positive Brazilians are "fortunate" that U.S. funding is "only a small part" of their country's national AIDS program, the editorial concludes (Sacramento Bee, 5/7).

Back to other news for May 10, 2005


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2004 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
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This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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