Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

International News

HIV Prevalence Rises in Swaziland Despite Efforts to Fight Disease

May 24, 2005

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Toronto's Globe and Mail on Tuesday examined the "unexpected" rise in Swaziland's estimated HIV prevalence rate from 38.6% in 2002 to 42.6% in 2004 -- the highest rate in the world -- despite "massive efforts to stop the spread of the disease." African AIDS advocates said the results of the latest HIV sentinel survey conducted in 2004 among women at prenatal clinics are "shocking and devastating," according to the Globe and Mail. Following the 2002 sentinel survey, the government "poured money" into HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention, and the Global Fund To Fight AIDS Tuberculosis and Malaria has contributed about $16 million to HIV/AIDS programs in the country, the Globe and Mail reports. However, many Swazi men continue to "justify" the traditional practice of polygamy, which contributes to the spread of HIV. King Mswati III, "who holds enormous cultural influence as well as political power," has more than 12 wives, according to the Globe and Mail (Nolen [1], Globe and Mail, 5/24).

Toronto-Based Company Developing Vaginal Microbicide
The Globe and Mail on Tuesday also examined Toronto-based Polydex Pharmaceuticals' vaginal microbicide Ushercell, which was "almost inadvertently ... invented" after being "originally designed for use in processing instant-camera film" (Nolen [2], Globe and Mail, 5/24). Microbicides include a range of products such as gels, films, sponges and other products that could help prevent the sexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. HIV is transmitted primarily through heterosexual intercourse in much of Africa and Asia, but no female-controlled HIV prevention method is widely available (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 5/4). The Eastern Virginia Medical School's CONRAD program plans to conduct a Phase III trial of Ushercell with almost 5,000 women in India and five African countries beginning next month (Nolen [2], Globe and Mail, 5/24).

Back to other news for May 24, 2005

Advertisement

Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2004 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More News and Research on Microbicides

Tools
 

Advertisement