Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Prevention/Epidemiology

Latino Adolescents Receiving Culturally Adapted HIV Prevention Course Less Likely to Have Sex, More Likely to Use Condoms, Study Says

August 9, 2006

Latino adolescents who are given a culturally specific HIV prevention and sex education course are less likely to have intercourse and more likely to use condoms than Latinos who do not receive the course, according to a study published in the August 2006 issue of the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, CQ HealthBeat reports (Reichard, CQ HealthBeat, 8/8). Antonia Villarruel, a professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing, and colleagues enrolled 249 Latinos and 304 Latinas ages 13 to 18 who were enrolled in northeast Philadelphia schools (Villarruel et al., Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, August 2006). More than 85% of the participants in the study -- which was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research -- were Puerto Rican, nearly 50% were not born in the mainland U.S., and more than 40% reported having sexual intercourse at least once (NIH release, 8/7).

Study Details
According to CQ HealthBeat, some of the participants were enrolled in a culturally specific program that taught about general health -- including diet improvement; the importance of exercise; and avoiding tobacco, alcohol and drugs -- but did not talk about sex. The other group received a Latino-tailored program with messages that abstinence was the only infallible means of preventing HIV transmission and that for those who have sex should use condoms. The program also discussed the positive and negative characteristics of the "machismo associated with Hispanic culture," CQ HealthBeat reports. It emphasized that adolescent boys could show strength by protecting themselves and their families from HIV by abstaining from sex or using condoms and told girls that the safeguards provided from abstinence or condoms would protect their families, according to CQ HealthBeat. Both programs included six, 50-minute classes on consecutive Saturdays to small groups of both sexes in English and Spanish, and researchers followed students for one year. The study finds that students who received the sex education instruction were 34% less likely to report having sex in the previous three months, 47% less likely to report multiple sex partners and significantly more likely to report condom use if they had sex than students in the other group (CQ HealthBeat, 8/8). According to NIH, HIV incidence was three times higher for Latinos in 2001 than incidence for non-Latino whites (NIH release, 8/7).

Back to other news for August 9, 2006

Advertisement

Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2006 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More HIV News

Tools
 

Advertisement