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HIV Life Cycle
Protein Glycosylation

Certain viral proteins undergo glycosylation, which has been pursued as a target for possible intervention (1-2). Castanospermine, a naturally occurring alkaloid and inhibitor of glucosidase-I served as a lead compound for the development of analogs. N-Butyl deoxynojirimycin(butyl-DNJ) and 6-butyl-castanospermine represent analogs with more potent activity against HIV (3).

References

  1. JOHNSON, V.A.; WALKER, B.D.; BARLOW, M.A.; PARADIS, T.J.; CHOU, T.C.; HIRSCH, M.S., Synergistic inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 replication in vitro by castanospermine and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine . ANTIMICROB AGENTS CHEMOTHER 33:53-57 (1989).

  2. RUPRECHT, R.M.; MULLANEY, S.; ANDERSEN, J.; BRONSON, R., In vivo analysis of castanospermine, a candidate antiretroviral agent . J AIDS 2:149 (1989).

  3. SUNKARA, P.S., TAYLOR, D., KANG, M., BOWLIN, T., LIU, P., TYMS, A., SJOERDSMA, A. Anti-HIV activity of castanospermine analogs. LANCET, 1989;1:1206 (1989).

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