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HIV/AIDS Statistics

February 2002

HIV/AIDS Worldwide

  • As of the end of 2001, an estimated 40 million people worldwide -- 37.2 million adults and 2.7 million children younger than 15 years -- were living with HIV/AIDS. More than 70 percent of these people (28.1 million) live in Sub-Saharan Africa; another 15 percent (6.1 million) live in South and Southeast Asia.1

  • Worldwide, approximately one in every 100 adults aged 15 to 49 is HIV-infected. In Sub-Saharan Africa, about 8.4 percent of all adults in this age group are HIV-infected. In 16 African countries, the prevalence of HIV infection among adults aged 15 to 49 exceeds 10 percent.1

  • Approximately 48 percent of adults living with HIV/AIDS worldwide are women.1

  • An estimated 5 million new HIV infections occurred worldwide during 2001; that is, about 14,000 infections each day. More than 95 percent of these new infections occurred in developing countries.1

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  • In 2001, approximately 6,000 young people aged 15 to 24 became infected with HIV every day -- that is, about five every minute.1

  • In 2001 alone, HIV/AIDS-associated illnesses caused the deaths of approximately 3 million people worldwide, including an estimated 580,000 children younger than 15 years.1

  • Worldwide, more than 80 percent of all adult HIV infections have resulted from heterosexual intercourse.1


HIV/AIDS in the United States

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 850,000 to 950,000 U.S. residents are living with HIV infection, one-quarter of whom are unaware of their infection.2

  • Approximately 40,000 new HIV infections occur each year in the United States, about 70 percent among men and 30 percent among women. Of these newly infected people, half are younger than 25 years of age.3,4

  • Of new infections among men in the United States, CDC estimates that approximately 60 percent of men were infected through homosexual sex, 25 percent through injection drug use, and 15 percent through heterosexual sex. Of newly infected men, approximately 50 percent are black, 30 percent are white, 20 percent are Hispanic, and a small percentage are members of other racial/ethnic groups.4

  • Of new infections among women in the United States, CDC estimates that approximately 75 percent of women were infected through heterosexual sex and 25 percent through injection drug use. Of newly infected women, approximately 64 percent are black, 18 percent are white, 18 percent are Hispanic, and a small percentage are members of other racial/ethnic groups.4

  • In the United States, 793,026 cases of AIDS had been reported to the CDC through June 30, 2001.5

  • The estimated number of new adult/adolescent AIDS cases diagnosed in the United States was 49,407 in 1997, 42,508 in 1998, 40,671 in 1999, and 40,106 in 2000.5

  • The estimated number of new pediatric AIDS cases (cases among individuals younger than age 13) in the United States fell from 949 in 1992 to 105 in 2000.5

  • The rate of adult/adolescent AIDS cases reported in the United States in 2000 (per 100,000 population) was 74.2 among blacks, 30.4 among Hispanics, 12.7 among American Indians/Alaska Natives, 7.9 among whites, and 4.3 among Asians/Pacific Islanders.6

  • From 1985 to 2000, the proportion of adult/adolescent AIDS cases in the United States reported in women increased from 7 percent to 25 percent.6

  • As of the end of 2000, an estimated 338,978 people in the United States were living with AIDS.5

  • As of June 30, 2001, 457,667 deaths among people with AIDS had been reported to the CDC.5 AIDS is now the fifth leading cause of death in the United States among people aged 25 to 44, and is the leading cause of death for black men in this age group. Among black women in this age group, HIV ranks third.7

  • The estimated annual number of AIDS-related deaths in the United States fell approximately 70 percent from 1995 to 1999, from 51,117 deaths in 1995 to 15,245 deaths in 2000.5

  • Of the estimated 15,245 AIDS-related deaths in the United States in 1999, approximately 50 percent were among blacks, 30 percent among whites, 18 percent among Hispanics, and less than 1 percent among Asians/Pacific Islanders and American Indians/Alaska Natives.5


References

  1. UNAIDS. Report on the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic: December 2001 (PDF).
  2. Fleming, P.L. et al. HIV Prevalence in the United States, 2000. 9th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Wash., Feb. 24-28, 2002. Abstract 11.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV and AIDS -- United States, 1981-2001 (PDF). MMWR 2001;50:430-434.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV Prevention Strategic Plan Through 2005. January 2001.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report 2001;13(no.1):1-41.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report 2000 (PDF);12(no.2):1-44.
  7. Hoyert, D.L. et al. Deaths: Final data for 1999. National Vital Statistics Reports; vol. 49, no. 8. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics, 2001.


  
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