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Love and Relationships, Positive Style: A Video Collection

February 9, 2011

Ah, love: It's exhilarating, it's fun, it's challenging, it's terrifying, and when you're HIV positive, there are all sorts of additional issues to consider. We asked a diverse array of people -- HIV advocates, HIVers and negative folks, gays and heterosexuals, the single and partnered -- what their thoughts were on finding love when you're HIV positive.



Jack Mackenroth

"I have not found love -- but I'm looking for it, I must be honest!" Fashion designer and well-known HIV advocate Jack Mackenroth doesn't waste his time with potential partners for whom his HIV status is an issue.



To watch more videos, click one of the faces below; the video will appear in the space above.


"I have not found love -- but I'm looking for it, I must be honest!" Fashion designer and well-known HIV advocate Jack Mackenroth doesn't waste his time with potential partners for whom his HIV status is an issue.

"I would like to be in love with ... somebody who will really, really accept me for who I am." Lisa D. from Pittsburgh, Pa., who's been living with HIV for more than 17 years, talks about worries that many HIV-positive women face in the dating world.

"Love hard, because you never know what you're going to get out of something unless you put yourself in it, 100 percent!" Sharita Ambrose of Austin, Texas, shares tips she's learned from working with clients at the Texas HIV Connection.

"People actually say they're OK once you've disclosed, but ... all of a sudden your phone calls are not answered." Sharon DeCuir of Baton Rouga, La., talks about some potential partners not being honest with their feelings about her HIV status.

"There can be some barriers -- intimately as well as emotionally," says Tamika, who has in the past been involved in a magnetic relationship in which she was the HIV-negative partner.

"I'm pretty settled in my ways and it's kind of tough to look for someone," says Bill from San Francisco. Bill has been HIV positive for more than 20 years. He talks about being an older, gay man in an age-conscious culture.

Brian Watson, director of programs at Transgender Health Empowerment in Washington, D.C., talks about the need to end the stigma surrounding HIV so that disclosing to potential love interests is not so taxing.

"I tell them from the first day." David I. Joseph (Chakena R. Conway), who lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., talks about always disclosing his HIV status early on to potential dating partners.

Aja Rodriguez, an HIV prevention counselor in Knoxville, Tenn., tells the story of "Matt" and "Dan," a magnetic couple she once knew in which the negative partner eventually became HIV positive.

Eyvette Tyler of Good Samaritan Project in Kansas City, Mo., talks about finding love in the support groups she facilitates -- and helps empower HIV-positive women to believe they can date again.

"It's really a matter of love and trust and respect for one another." George Bellinger Jr. is an HIV-negative man who has been in relationships with HIV-positive men, and shares his advice for those exploring a relationship with someone of a different HIV status.
 

Click here for last year's podcasts.




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