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Prevention/Epidemiology

Ethics and the Future of PrEP

January 14, 2011

"Ethical Issues Raised By PrEP Are Difficult, But Not Insurmountable"
"The AIDS movement is at a pivotal point in history, where it will face scrutiny not only to demonstrate that interventions are cost-effective and equitably distributed, but also to balance resource demands with other global health imperatives, such as maternal/child health, noncommunicable diseases, and the human resources and infrastructure required to ensure the health of individuals and communities," write the authors of a JAMA Commentary that examines the ethical issues surrounding preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). "The ethical issues raised by PrEP are difficult, but not insurmountable," the authors write before offering guidance on ways to "help ensure ethical allocation under circumstances of scarcity" (Gostin et al., 1/12).

Nature Medicine Community Corner Asks Health Experts to Weigh in on Future of PrEP
A Nature Medicine Community Corner asks health experts to weigh in on "the implications for the implementation of HIV prevention programs with antiretroviral drugs, the impact on public health and the next step in HIV therapeutics." In response, Diane Havlir of the University of California San Francisco writes, "With many people infected with HIV already struggling to access antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally -- even in the U.S. -- one anticipates a constructive debate on resource allocation for PrEP. The good news is that the era of combination prevention that harnesses the power of ART has arrived. Indeed, 2011 promises to be an interesting year as this field takes off." The piece also features comments by: Myron Cohen, director of the University of North Carolina's Institute of Global Health and Infectious Diseases; Steven Deeks of the University of California; and John Mellors of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (1/7).

Back to other news for January 2011


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
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This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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