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Atripla's Co-Pay Program Now Saves More Money

By Enid Vázquez

September/October 2010

The co-pay program for Atripla now eliminates the requirement that people first pay $50 out-of-pocket before financial assistance begins. The same is true for the drugs that make up Atripla (Sustiva and Truvada), as well as the medications that make up Truvada (Emtriva and Viread).

According to a spokesperson for Gilead Sciences, "Going forward, the Atripla Co-Pay Assistance Program will pay up to $200 per month (or $2,400 per year) toward out-of-pocket expenses for Atripla beginning with the first dollar of co-payment required by a patient's insurance plan. Bristol-Myers Squibb and Gilead Sciences, LLC [the makers of Atripla], are working as quickly as possible to implement this change [at the time of this announcement in June]."

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The program is not available to patients in Massachusetts or to those whose prescriptions are eligible to be reimbursed, in whole or part, by Medicare, Medicaid, any other federal- or state-funded health care benefit program, or by private plans or other health or pharmacy benefit programs which reimburse patients for the entire cost of their prescription drugs.

To enroll, people taking Atripla must get a co-pay assistance card from their health care provider, or call the toll-free number 1-866-784-3431. The card must be activated before first use by calling this number.

People who do not have insurance, are underinsured, or who otherwise need assistance may call the Atripla Patient Assistance Program (PAP) toll-free at 1-866-290-4767.

For updates on all HIV drug co-pay assistance programs, see the 14th Annual HIV Drug Guide article "Pick a Card, Pick a Plan," or go to www.positivelyaware.com and search the e-updates for patient assistance programs. You can also get the latest information by searching the website of the drugs you are taking, such as www.atripla.com.


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