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Press Release

ADAP Crisis Anticipates Relief From Federal Resources

August 27, 2010

Washington, D.C. -- There are now 3,337 individuals on waiting lists to receive access to HIV-related medications through AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) in 13 states. This number is more than double the May 2004 historical high of individuals on waiting lists and represents a 78 percent increase in the last month (from 1,879 on July 21, 2010). In addition to initiating waiting lists, 22 states (including 8 with current waiting lists) have implemented or anticipate implementing other access restrictions such as lowering income eligibility criteria, removing drugs from their formularies and capping expenditures. Several states report an uncertainty about covering current clients through the end of the ADAP fiscal year (March 31, 2011) without additional funding and several have disenrolled clients as their programs have decreased income eligibility levels. Other states are also considering this action. To see a list of states with access restrictions please visit NASTAD's website at www.NASTAD.org.

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The Obama Administration recently announced that it reprogrammed $25 million to address ADAP waiting lists and other unmet ADAP needs. This funding was distributed to 30 states on Tuesday, August 24, 2010 but recipient states have not yet had time to move eligible waiting list clients into their programs. In addition, approximately $17 million in Ryan White Part B Supplemental grants will be distributed to states in late-September. These grants are expected to be used in many states to help address ADAP needs.

"NASTAD is thankful that some relief is on its way to ADAPs," NASTAD Executive Director Julie Scofield remarked. "The combination of $42 million in Emergency ADAP and Part B Supplemental funding, reduced drug prices negotiated with seven of the eight HIV drug manufacturers, and restored state appropriations to ADAP will provide that relief. However, these will not be sufficient to shore-up all state ADAPs and prevent further cost-containment measures or access barriers," continued Scofield.

On August 20, 2010, President Obama requested a total increase of $50 million for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program in FY2011. This is a $30 million increase from his February Budget Request and the same amount of funding provided in the pending House and Senate appropriations bills. The White House intends to continue funding those states that received the $25 million in emergency ADAP funding in FY2011 by requesting the funds be run through Part B Supplemental. NASTAD and the HIV/AIDS community continue to advocate for sufficient FY2010 and FY2011 funding from both federal and state governments to end the ADAP crisis. The future for clients dependent upon life saving HIV medications remains uncertain for the next several years.



  
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This article was provided by National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors. Visit NASTAD's website to find out more about their activities and publications.
 
See Also
ADAP Watch: Waiting Lists Reach 3,337 in 13 States as of Aug. 26
2014 National ADAP Monitoring Project Annual Report (PDF)
ADAP Waiting List Update: 35 People in 1 State as of July 23
More News on ADAP Funding and Activism

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