Print this page    •   Back to Web version of article

Council on Foreign Relations Examines Politics of HIV Donor Support

August 6, 2010

An expert brief posted on the Council for Foreign Relation's website examines the "messy politics" of HIV donor support. Despite criticism, the author writes, the U.S. government is "by far the biggest supporter of both bilateral and multilateral HIV efforts," noting that when combined with private donations including the Gates Foundation, the U.S. accounts for 85 percent of global HIV/AIDS support. The author also observes the "essentially zeroed out" commitment from AIDS 2010's host Austria and notes that none of the Eastern European countries, including Russia, "even sent high-level delegations to the conference, though the region has the fastest-growing HIV epidemic." The author also describes the world's growing economies -- China, Brazil and India -- as "negligible donors." Additionally, the post examines President Obama's FY2011 foreign assistance budget request and how Congress has responded (Garrett, 8/4).

Back to other news for August 2010


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. You can find this article online by typing this address into your Web browser:
http://www.thebody.com/content/art57987.html

General Disclaimer: TheBody.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through TheBody.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider.