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International AIDS Conference in Vienna Starts Tomorrow

By Miguel Gomez and Michelle Samplin-Salgado

July 17, 2010

Red ribbon on parliament building in Vienna.

Red ribbon on parliament building in Vienna.

This article was cross-posted from the AIDS.gov blog. Miguel Gomez is AIDS.gov's director and Michelle Samplin-Salgado is AIDS.gov's new media strategist.

The 18th International AIDS Conference (IAC) starts tomorrow in Vienna. We sent our very first tweet from IAC in Mexico City two years ago and we've come a long way since then.

For this year's conference, we've created a website where you can search the more than 150 U.S. Government presentations. The site will link you to our daily podcasts and blog posts, as well as webcasts of the plenary sessions (courtesy of Kaiser Family Foundation). We'll also be using Facebook and Twitter (follow the hashtag #AIDS2010) to keep you informed and engaged.

Furthermore, last Tuesday the White House released the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. We'll be kicking off the U.S. Government's activities in Vienna with a special session about the Strategy. If you're in Vienna, please join us in Room 8 of the Reed Messe Wein. Otherwise, we'll covering that session here and on Twitter.

Whether you're attending the conference virtually or in person, we encourage you to join the conversation!

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