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Positive Policy:

New Avenues for Expression and Engagement With Youth Around Sexual Health Information

By Josie Halpern-Finnerty

February 16, 2010

This article was cross-posted from the AIDS.gov blog.

Podcast of this blog post
Sex::Tech 2010

The Internet Sexuality Information Services, Inc. (ISIS) hosts an annual conference on using technology to increase access to sexual health information among youth -- and Sex::Tech is less than two weeks away! As ISIS' Margaret Lucas told us, "Sex::Tech brings together leaders in the fields of STD/HIV prevention, education, unplanned pregnancy prevention, government and technology to explore ways new media can improve young people's access to sexual health information. These pioneers will lead discussions on ways to harness the Internet, social networks and mobile technologies to advance sexual health. The Sex::Tech 2010 program includes successes, innovations, technology intensives and expert insights, in addition to providing a platform to showcase youth-led advocacy."

Last year, we heard that we need to involve youth (or our other audiences) in planning and evaluation, and learned about new texting campaigns and sexual health websites developed by and for teens. Jennie Anderson, AIDS.gov Director of Communications, got a sneak-peek at some of the initiatives that will be presented this year as a member of the Sex::Tech planning committee. We are particularly excited to hear keynotes from Beth Kanter (one of our new media inspirations) and Tina Hoff (of the Kaiser Family Foundation ), and can't wait to hear the latest about bridging the digital divide to engage with youth from minority communities around sexual health information. We are also looking forward to sharing our own lessons learned from this year's Facing AIDS for World AIDS Day campaign.

You can still register to join Sex::Tech at the J.W. Marriott in San Francisco on February 26 and 27. Margaret also told us that the first-day plenary will feature the winner of the Say What?!? contest -- a partnership between MTV, Funny Or Die, and SayNow -- where youth were asked to share the craziest sexual health advice an adult has given them.

Check out the Twitter conversation already taking place in preparation for Sex::Tech using the #sextech hashtag, and get ready to join in! You can get conference updates from the Sex::Tech Twitter account or Facebook, and you can check out some of the photos from last year.

See Also
Quiz: Are You at Risk for HIV?
10 Common Fears About HIV Transmission
More on HIV Prevention Multimedia for Young People
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Reader Comments:

Comment by: jully (Ahmedabad) Fri., Jun. 4, 2010 at 8:20 am EDT
Hello,
Nice blog i like it
Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. For sexual health to be attained and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled.
Thanks
Reply to this comment


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