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Three New Drugs: Buying and Access

October 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Atazanavir, emtricitabine and enfuvirtide are available by prescription. Most states cover these drugs through their AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAP). For information on your state ADAP eligibility and to find out if these drugs are covered, contact Project Inform's toll-free Hotline at 1-800-822-7422. Information is also available through the AIDS Treatment Data Network at 1-800-734-7104 or www.atdn.org. People who lack insurance, Medicaid, ADAP coverage or cannot afford to pay for the drug can sometimes gain free access to them through the manufacturer's Patient Assistance Program.

  • Atazanavir: 1-800-272-4878

  • Emtricitabine: 1-800-445-3235

  • Enfuvirtide: 1-866-694-6670

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Currently, supplies of enfuvirtide are limited, so the company has set up the "Progressive Distribution Program." Doctors apply on behalf of their patients. Once the supply meets the ongoing needs of the individual, the prescription is "activated" and the drug is shipped either to the patient or doctor. Prescriptions are filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, doctors should call 1-866-694-6670 to enroll their patients. Thereafter, patients may call directly to check on their status and ask questions. Enrollment forms are available at www.fuzeon.com.


Back to the Project Inform Perspective October 2003 contents page.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by Project Inform. It is a part of the publication Project Inform Perspective. Visit Project Inform's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More on HIV Medications
More News on T-20 (Enfuvirtide, Fuzeon)

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