Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Comments Comments
  •  (3)
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

International News

Forbes Examines Ongoing Discussions Over HIV/AIDS Drugs Patent Pools

December 11, 2009

Forbes examines the ongoing discussions between aid groups and drug manufacturers over the formation of an HIV/AIDS drugs patent pool to help drive down costs for developing countries.

"The concept is for drug manufacturers like Merck or Gilead Sciences to give a limited number of generic drug makers access to the intellectual property for AIDS drugs that are commonplace in North America and Europe but have not reached places like sub-Saharan Africa or parts of Asia. Competition between multiple generic drug makers would then drive prices down dramatically, making the latest AIDS drugs available in even the poorest parts of the world," the magazine writes. "Since the patent pool license would only apply to a select number of poorer countries, the patent pool could save lives without hurting sales in rich countries, intellectual property lawyers say," according to the article (Bahree/Herper, 12/10).

"It sounds straightforward, but the politics are anything but," Forbes writes in a second story. "Three years after UNITAID broached the [patent pool] idea, it says that so far only Gilead Sciences, Johnson & Johnson and Merck are 'actively engaged' in negotiating with UNITAID over the patent pool. Since February UNITAID has been lobbying 9 other drugmakers and 17 generics manufacturers to sit down and discuss the idea," Forbes writes.

Advertisement
The article examines the divisions between HIV/AIDS advocates, who want countries in Africa, as well as India, China, Brazil and Thailand, to have access to the drugs, and drug makers, who say such broad access could be a "deal-braker" -- an issue that will be discussed during a UNITAID board meeting this month. The article also features comments from branded and generic drug company representatives and an on-the-ground aid worker in Africa, who expresses concern about growing resistance to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens due to a lack of drug access (Bahree/Herper [2], 12/10).

Back to other news for December 2009


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
  • Email Email
  • Comments Comments
  •  (3)
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More on HIV Drug Patent Policies

 

Add Your Comment:
(Please note: Your name and comment will be public, and may even show up in
Internet search results. Be careful when providing personal information! Before
adding your comment, please read TheBody.com's Comment Policy.)

Your Name:


Your Location:

(ex: San Francisco, CA)

Your Comment:

Characters remaining:

Tools
 

Advertisement