Print this page    •   Back to Web version of article

Medical News
University of Utah Researchers Testing Gel That May Help Prevent Spread of HIV

August 11, 2009

A "unique vaginal gel" being developed by researchers from the University of Utah could be used to help prevent the spread of HIV, according to a study published in the Journal of Advanced Functional Materialss, the Deseret News reports. Julie Jay is a doctoral candidate of pharmaceutical chemistry at the university and an author of the study testing the new gel. "The new gel, she said, could be inserted a few hours before sex and would essentially detect the presence of semen and provide a protective barrier between the vaginal tissue and HIV. It leaves the body as vaginal tissues naturally re-acidify, and is either eliminated or absorbed," the article states (Leonard, 8/10). Scientists are calling the product, which changes structure when it comes into contact with semen, a "molecular condom," Patrick Kiser, an associate professor of bioengineering at the university, said (Ziegler, KCPW, 8/10). Kiser said human clinical trials could begin in the next few years (8/10).

Back to other news for August 2009


This information was reprinted from kff.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily U.S. HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, and sign up for email delivery. © Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.




This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily U.S. HIV/AIDS Report. You can find this article online by typing this address into your Web browser:
http://www.thebody.com/content/art53181.html

General Disclaimer: TheBody.com is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through TheBody.com should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider.