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You Gotta Have Friends
A Video Blog

By Mark S. King

April 22, 2009

Thirty years ago I was a skinny college freshman at the University of New Orleans who had no idea that a fellow student would become a brother to me. Charles was the first friend I told when I tested HIV positive. The value of his friendship was something I took for granted through years of drug addiction (and as lovers came and went). Somehow we've remained constants in each other's lives even as I moved around the country. And just how good a friend is Charles today? Good enough to spend hours at my house, behind a camera, quietly filming a wild night of discussion, gossip and secrets that became this video blog.

In this video you'll meet my friends James, Craig, Antron and Eric. They are all gay men living with HIV, so consider this a "meet and greet," because you'll be seeing them again soon. We had so much fun trading tales of love, sex and disclosure that we're going to make this a regular feature on my blog. And by the way, yes, they're all single.

And since we'll be doing this again, it would be great to hear from you. Did you enjoy this get-together? What kinds of topics would be helpful to you? Are there things you wish you could discuss with your friends but don't? I'll take your questions or topics and spring them on the guys the next time we get together!

In the meantime, my cyber-friends, please be well.

Mark

To contact Mark, click here.


Episode Eight: You Gotta Have Friends

To read more about one of Mark's friends -- Craig -- click here.




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