Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Women's Rights

From Take Charge of Your Body: A Woman's Guide to Health

Fall 1998

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

An important part of taking charge of one's health is remembering that, should you choose to exercise them, you have certain rights as a consumer.

  1. I have a right to be treated as an equal human being.

  2. I have a right to be listened to and have my problems taken seriously.

  3. I have a right to an explanation that I can understand in my native language on any questions concerning my health care.

    Advertisement

  4. I have a right to know the choice I face in getting tested for any health problem, and to have the possible side-effects of any drugs of surgical treatments clearly explained.

  5. I have a right to choose the types of treatment I prefer from among the options offered to me by my doctor.

  6. I have a right for normal events in my life, such a pregnancy and menopause, not to be treated as diseases requiring treatment.

  7. I have a right to choose natural therapies and not be ridiculed for doing so.

  8. I have a right to request a second opinion on any major surgery of health decision.

  9. I have a right to refuse any drug or surgical treatment.

  10. I have a responsibility to become knowledgeable about my body and how it works.

  11. I have a responsibility to learn as much as possible about my health problems so I can make informed choices.

  12. I have a responsibility to exercise, look after my diet, reduce stress and relax on a regular basis.

  13. I have a responsibility to avoid pressuring my doctor into giving me drugs when I don't need them.

  14. I have a responsibility to prepare my questions for my doctor beforehand and to schedule adequate appointment time to discuss them.

  15. I'm ultimately responsible for my healthcare, using my doctor as a resource rather than an authority.


Back to the Women Alive Fall 1998 Contents Page.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Women Alive. It is a part of the publication Women Alive Newsletter.
 
See Also
More on HIV Treatment and Women

Tools
 

Advertisement