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prevention/epidemilogy

Attitudes of Men in an Australian Male Tolerance Study Towards Microbicide Use

October 20, 2008

Currently in development to provide additional options to prevent STD infections, vaginal microbicides are generally promoted as a female-initiated product. However, because men may influence product uptake and how it is used, the views of men are important as well. In the current study, 36 men were enrolled in a seven-day, phase I clinical safety trial of SPL7013 Gel. The men were interviewed before and after use of the gel. The trial did not involve use of the product during sex. Interviews with the men were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. A framework approach was employed for analysis. Mean age of the men was 37.

Although interested in the concept of vaginal microbicides, the men had little knowledge about them and various beliefs about how they work, with most assessing microbicide use in relation to condoms and lubricants. Many said they would want a microbicide to be as effective as condoms. The men did not anticipate difficulties in discussing microbicide use with partners. Many participants thought a microbicide would be less intrusive to use than condoms. Some thought the product's lubricating properties would enhance sexual pleasure. Some men anticipated using a microbicide with a condom or with a lubricant. Some men raised questions about timing and the use of microbicides for various types of sex acts.

"No major barriers to microbicide use were found in this sample of Australian men, who anticipated being willing to use them if they are shown to be safe and effective," the authors concluded. "Our findings should help to inform the design of further studies as well as future information materials and anticipatory guidance."

Back to other news for October 2008

Adapted from:
Sexual Health
08.2008; Vol. 5; No. 3: P. 273-278; Wendy R. Holmes, Lisa Maher, Susan L. Rosenthal


  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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