Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Medical News

Nipple Shield That Deactivates HIV Prevents Virus Transmission During Breastfeeding, BBC News Reports

September 24, 2008

A nipple shield that disinfects milk as it leaves the breast has shown to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission, BBC News reports. Devised by Stephen Gerrard, a University of Cambridge engineer, the shield employs a detergent used by biochemists to denature proteins for analysis, and a layer of cotton-wool soaked in the chemical is added to a conventional shield, which deactivates the virus. According to the BBC News, the layer deactivates the virus without having to go through heat treatment -- the normal treatment to deactivate HIV.

Gerrard said the project could have benefits beyond that of HIV prevention. "We were concerned that using our nipple shield could be stigmatizing, since it would identify a mother as HIV infected," he said, adding, "We're considering marketing it as a way to deliver medicine or micronutrient supplements to aid breastfeeding. For example, they can also be used for iron or iodine deficiency."

The shield is the outcome of a project assigned to Gerrard and a team of five others at the International Development Design Summit in the U.S. to develop a practical design for heating breastmilk to deactivate HIV. Gerrard said that the team "quickly established this may be too lengthy a process for many women in developing countries so they might not have the time for it." According to Gerrard, the team based the shield on research done by a group at Drexel University that focused on sodium dodecyl sulphate, which can kill HIV quickly and in fairly nontoxic concentrations (BBC News, 9/22).

Back to other news for September 2008

Advertisement


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2008 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More HIV News

Tools
 

Advertisement