Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Press Release

Global Fund Investments Support AIDS Treatment for 1.75 Million People

Number of Bed Nets Distributed for Malaria Doubled in One Year

June 9, 2008

Geneva -- The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria today announced that 1.75 million people living with HIV have been reached with lifesaving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment through AIDS programs it supports, a 59 per cent increase over results reported a year ago.

Global Fund-supported tuberculosis programs have so far put more than 3.9 million people on effective TB drugs treatment. Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected people; the World Health Organization estimates that TB accounts for up to a third of AIDS deaths worldwide.

The Global Fund also reported progress in the fight against malaria, with a cumulative total of 59 million insecticide-treated bed nets delivered to families at risk of contracting the disease through its funded programs. This represents a 98 percent increase over the quantity of 30 million nets which had been delivered by mid 2007.

Advertisement
The results figures were released to coincide with a UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS at the UN Headquarters in New York which opens Tuesday. During the meeting, Member States and representatives of civil society will review progress towards targets agreed by the Assembly in its 2001 Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS and its 2006 Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS.

Last week, the World Health Organization, UNAIDS and Unicef announced that nearly three million people were receiving ARV treatment for AIDS worldwide by the end of 2007. The new figures announced by the Global Fund today show that around 60 per cent of all people receiving ARV treatment worldwide do so through Global Fund-supported programs.

The other major financer of ARV treatment programs, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) will announce its own figures separately at a later date. PEPFAR and the Global Fund jointly support many AIDS treatment programs.

The Global Fund provides around 20 percent of international resources to fight AIDS, as well as two-thirds of international funding to fight tuberculosis and three quarters of international funding to fight malaria.

"These new results are a testament to the hard work of our partners and the millions of health workers on the ground who work tirelessly day in day out to make sure that Global Fund resources are put to best use," said Dr Michel Kazatchkine, Executive Director of the Global Fund. "We are halfway to 2015, which is the year the United Nations has set to reach the Millennium Development Goals. So far, we are far behind the targets in reducing the mortality from AIDS, TB and malaria, but the results coming in over the past years give hope that we can still catch up and reach the targets if we continue to scale up investments."

Intervention Mid 2007 Dec 2007 Mid 2008 Increase over one year

HIV
People on ARV treatment

1.1 million 1.4 million 1.75 million 59%

TB
Cases treated under DOTS

2.8 million 3.3 million 3.9 million 39%

Malaria
ITNs distributed

30 million 46 million 59 million

97%

Additional results showed that 46 million people have been reached with HIV counseling and testing; 2.8 million AIDS orphans have been provided with basic care and support; 60 million malaria drug treatments have been delivered; 65 million people have been reached with community outreach services for one or several of the three diseases; and 7.6 million health or community workers have been trained to deliver services since the Global Fund started financing grants in 2003.

The results reported today are the aggregated results from individual programs supported by the Global Fund in 136 countries. Measuring performance is at the core of the Global Fund's performance-based financing system which only disburses money based on targets reached. The quality of the results is assured through the work of the Global Fund's verifying agency in each country and independent data and systems reviews.

"These figures are the living proof that Global Fund resources are a major driving force in the global fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria," said Rajat Gupta, the Chair of the Global Fund Board. "Our donors, our technical partners and the people implementing our programs in the countries are all an integral part of the lifesaving mission of the Global Fund. We thank each and every one of them."

Wednesday, the Global Fund will launch a major advocacy project to highlight the benefits of AIDS treatment and prevention programs. The project, Access to Life, is a collaboration between the renowned photo agency Magnum and the Global Fund. Through photography, video and text, it portrays 34 people from nine countries as they start ARV treatment and follows them through the first four months of the treatment. The Access to Life exhibition will open at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. before touring several cities around the world.

The project will be available online from 11 June on www.theglobalfund.org/accesstolife. For project images available for publication in coverage of the Access to Life project, please contact Rosie Vanek at rosie.vanek@theglobalfund.org or +41 79 449 7380 / +1 (917) 370 4413.

Last week, the Global Fund also announced that it will launch a second call for proposals in 2008, inviting countries burdened by the three diseases to submit additional requests for funding. It will be the ninth round of funding since the Global Fund's creation in 2002, supplementing Round 8 which was launched in March this year and which has a submission deadline of 1 July. Round 9 will open on 1 October 2008 and the Board of the Global Fund is expected to approve new grants under this round at its Board Meeting in May 2009.

Demand for this additional round of funding arose from the growing impact of country-led AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria programs and recognition that an additional opportunity to access funding this year further supports the rapid scale-up of in-country efforts to reduce the burden of the three diseases.



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.
 
See Also
More on the Global AIDS Fund

Tools
 

Advertisement