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HIV/AIDS in the United States

August 2008

At the end of 2003,* an estimated 1,039,000 to 1,185,000 persons in the United States were living with HIV/AIDS.1 In 2006, 35,314 new cases of HIV/AIDS in adults, adolescents, and children were diagnosed in the 33 states with long-term, confidential name-based HIV reporting.2 CDC has developed a new and innovative system designed to estimate the number of new HIV infections (or incidence) for the United States in a given year. Using this new technology, CDC estimates that 56,300 new HIV infections occurred in the United States in 2006.3


By Sex

In 2006, almost three quarters of HIV/AIDS diagnoses among adolescents and adults were for males.

Sex of adults and adolescents with HIV/AIDS diagnosed during 2006

Sex of adults and adolescents with HIV/AIDS diagnosed during 2006  Females 26% Males 73% No. 35,180

Note. Based on data from 33 states with long-term, confidential name-based HIV reporting.


By Transmission Category

In 2006, the largest estimated proportion of HIV/AIDS diagnoses among adults and adolescents were for men who have sex with men (MSM), followed by persons infected through high-risk heterosexual contact.

Transmission categories of adults and adolescents with HIV/AIDS diagnosed during 2006

Transmission category for persons with a new HIV diagnosis in 2006   All Adults and Adolescents Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 3% Injection drug use 13% Male-to-male sexual contact 50% High-risk heterosexual contact 33% other 1% no. = 35,180

Transmission category for persons with a new HIV diagnosis in 2006   Males Male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use 5% Injection drug use 12% Male-to-male sexual contact 67% High-risk heterosexual contact 16% other <1% no. = 25,928

Transmission category for persons with a new HIV diagnosis in 2006   Females Injection drug use 19% High-risk heterosexual contact 80% other 1% no. = 9,252

Note. Based on data from 33 states with long-term, confidential name-based HIV reporting.

*The most recent year(s) for which these data are available.


By Race/Ethnicity

Although blacks, or African Americans, made up only 13% of the population in the 33 states, they accounted for almost half of the estimated number of HIV/AIDS diagnoses made during 2006.

Race/ethnicity of persons (including children) with
HIV/AIDS diagnosed during 2006

Race/ethnicity of persons with a new HIV diagnosis in 2006   Asian/Pacific Islanders 1% American Idian/Alaska Native <1% Black 49% Whilt 30% Hispanic 18% No. 35,314

Note. Based on data from 33 states with long-term, confidential name-based HIV reporting.


By Age

In 2006, persons aged 25-34 and persons aged 35-44 accounted for the largest proportions of newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS cases.

Age of persons with HIV/AIDS diagnosed during 2006


Trends in AIDS Diagnoses and Deaths

During the mid-to-late 1990s, advances in HIV treatments slowed the progression of HIV infection to AIDS and led to dramatic decreases in deaths among persons with AIDS living in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. In general, the trend in the estimated numbers of AIDS cases and deaths remained stable from 2005 through 2005. Estimates for 2006 suggest that the number of AIDS cases remained stable and that the number of deaths decreased; however, it is too early to determine whether this trend will hold. Better treatments have also led to an increase in the number of persons who are living with AIDS.

Estimated numbers of AIDS diagnoses, deaths, and persons living with AIDS, 2002-2006

 20022003200420052006Cumulative
(1981-2006)
AIDS diagnoses38,13238,53837,72636,55236,828982,498
Deaths of persons with AIDS16,94816,69016,39516,26814,016545,805
Persons living with AIDS350,419372,267393,598413,882436,693NA
NA, not applicable (the values given for each year are cumulative).
Based on data for the 50 states and the District of Columbia.


References

  1. Glynn M, et al. Estimated HIV prevalence in the United States at the end of 2003. National HIV Prevention Conference; June 12-15, 2005; Atlanta. Abstract T1-B1101.
  2. CDC. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2006. Vol. 18. Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2008.
  3. Hall HI, Ruiguang S, Rhodes P, et al. Estimation of HIV incidence in the United States. JAMA. 2008;300:520-529.




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