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Factors Associated With Recurrent Chlamydial Infection and Failure to Return for Retesting in Young Women Entering National Job Training Program, 1998-2005

April 17, 2008

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate factors associated with recurrent chlamydial infection and failure to return for retesting among socioeconomically disadvantaged women, ages 16 to 24, entering the National Job Training Program from 1998 to 2005. The researchers computed by sociodemographic variables the prevalence of chlamydia at the initial visit and recurrent infection (a positive chlamydia test one to two months after completing treatment).

At enrollment, a high prevalence of chlamydia -- 10.7 percent -- was noted. The prevalence of chlamydia varied by age, race/ethnicity, place of residence (South, Midwest, Northeast, West), year of test, and type of test.

Among those women who were infected at the initial visit, those less likely to be retested were younger women (ages 16-17), blacks and Hispanics, residents of the South and Midwest, and those tested in 1998-2000. Of the 13,550 infected women, 5,892 (43.5 percent) were retested. Among those who underwent retesting, 332 (5.6 percent) had recurrent infection one to two months after completing treatment. Chlamydia prevalence at retesting did not differ significantly by sociodemographic characteristics; however, the pattern of prevalence was similar to the pattern at the initial test. Similar findings were revealed by multivariate logistic regression analyses.

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"The high prevalence of recurrent infection in these women may be due to reinfection and/or treatment failure," the authors concluded. "The findings of this analysis underscore the need for retesting infected women regardless of their demographic characteristics."

Back to other news for April 2008

Adapted from:
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
04.2008; Vol. 35; No. 4: P. 368-371; M. Riduan Joesoef, M.D., Ph.D.; Hillard S. Weinstock, M.D., M.P.H.; Robert E. Johnson, M.D., M.P.H.


  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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