Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
HIV/AIDS Resource Center for African Americans
Kai Chandler Lois Crenshaw Gary Paul Wright Fortunata Kasege Keith Green Lois Bates Greg Braxton Vanessa Austin Bernard Jackson

Podcasts

What Are the Top Myths About HIV/AIDS in the African-American Community?

podcasts

Gary Bell
Gary Bell
Executive Director, Blacks Educating Blacks About Sexual Health, Philadelphia, Pa.

That it's a gay disease. In this country, HIV seems to have started in the gay community. But as it has grown, and particularly as it has spread around the world, it's apparent that the vast majority of people who have HIV are heterosexual. But because African Americans tend not to be involved in our own health care very much, we don't pay attention to that information.
Read More >>

Kenyon Farrow
Kenyon Farrow
Communications and Public Education Coordinator, New York State Black Gay Network, New York, N.Y.

Because it's been such a public conversation over the past couple of years, the myth of the DL [down low] -- that the men on the down low are the reason for high rates of HIV among black women. There is just no evidence to support it -- in fact, there is evidence that points otherwise.
Read More >>

Bethsheba Johnson
Bethsheba Johnson
Nurse Practitioner, Luck Care Center, Chicago, Ill.

There are a lot of myths about where HIV comes from. Mosquitoes, polio vaccines, the government -- to kill all African Americans. I hear those things repeatedly. I also hear HIV medications just help you die quicker -- that they cause more harm than good.
Read More >>

Victor McKamie
Victor McKamie
Executive Director, Minority AIDS Project, Los Angeles, Calif.

Top myths include "It doesn't feel good with a condom on." "I'm too large for that." "Black men are so large, they can't fit the condom." "You don't look gay, you look clean." "You're not thin, therefore you must be OK." Another major myth -- not just in the African-American community, but in society in general -- is that people in church are not having sex, not fornicating. "That everyone is looking for their perfect mate to get married." "That all men are primarily straight" -- that's been proven otherwise.
Read More >>

Carlos Velez
Carlos Velez
Director of Technical Assistance, Training and Treatment, National Minority AIDS Council, Washington, D.C.

"It's not going to happen to me," that's number one. Second one, "You can just say no" -- as far as I know, I don't know anyone who can just say no to sex or drugs. Also, "abstinence is great," and, "injection drug users will never change their behavior."
Read More >>

Ingrid Floyd
Ingrid Floyd
Iris House, New York City

One that we hear often from a lot of the teens that we work with that is always kind of baffling to us is that you can't get HIV through oral or anal sex.
Read More >>

Nyrobi Moss
Nyrobi Moss
SisterLove, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.

Wow. I've heard some stuff. I've been doing this a while. [laughs]
Read More >>

Eli Dancy
Eli Dancy
Black AIDS Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y.

One of the most outlandish myths I heard about HIV: Can I talk about the Magic Johnson thing -- the myth that he's cured?
Read More >>

Want more podcasts? Check out what African-American AIDS activist leaders and health professionals had to say in response to these questions:

What is the most critical HIV/AIDS issue facing the African-American community?
How have your relationships with family and friends changed since you were diagnosed?




 

Add Your Comment:
(Please note: Your name and comment will be public, and may even show up in
Internet search results. Be careful when providing personal information! Before
adding your comment, please read TheBody.com's Comment Policy.)

Your Name:


Your Location:

(ex: San Francisco, CA)

Your Comment:

Characters remaining:


Copyright © 2014 Remedy Health Media, LLC. All rights reserved.
Advertisement