Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

U.S. News

Lecturer Speaks on AIDS Epidemic at University of South Carolina

March 24, 2008

On Wednesday, Dr. David H. Ho gave a lecture and participated in a panel discussion about HIV/AIDS at a packed law school auditorium at the University of South Carolina-Columbia. Ho was awarded Time magazine's 1996 Man of the Year for his breakthrough advances in treating HIV.

"This is the worst plague in human history -- 25 million have already died," Ho told his audience. "Even though this is already a raging problem, it will continue to spread. There are 7,000 new infections each day. That adds up to two-and-a-half-million new infections each year."

An HIV/AIDS vaccine is not in the near future, either, said Ho. "I'm willing to go as far as saying there won't be [a preventive vaccine] in the next decade," he said, even though "there are a number of vaccine strategies that are being pursued."

Advertisement
"Despite many years of effort, only about one-and-a-half million people in the developing world have been treated," Ho said. "That leaves about 30 million" people with HIV/AIDS without treatment access, he said. Ho noted the AIDS treatment and care disparities between developing and developed nations. "There is an enormous amount of social injustice," he said, comparing the epidemic in Africa with that in the United States.

Nonetheless, Ho remains hopeful for the future. "Scientific advancements are being made rapidly in this field," he said.

At a panel discussion and Q&A following his lecture, Ho joined university and community panelists, who spoke about HIV/AIDS in South Carolina.

Everyone should be concerned about HIV/AIDS, said Christine Fritz, calling it "a human problem." "It's a big problem in South Carolina," said Sara Parrish, a third-year law student. "AIDS has always been a problem I've never known much about. It felt foreign."

Back to other news for March 2008

Adapted from:
University Wire
3.20.2008; Katie Jones, Daily Gamecock


  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More HIV News

Tools
 

Advertisement