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U.S. News

Ministers Call on U.S. Government to Declare HIV/AIDS Among Blacks Health Emergency, Propose Legislation to Address Disease

October 10, 2007

Ministers attending a conference hosted by the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS on Tuesday in New York City called on the government to declare HIV/AIDS among blacks a public health emergency and proposed legislation to address the disease within the community, the AP/Silive.com reports (Hajela, AP/Silive.com, 10/9). Ministers from across the country gathered on Monday for the two-day meeting with representatives from the National Medical Association, the Congressional Black Caucus and other groups to discuss HIV/AIDS issues in the black community (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 10/9).

The ministers called for the development of a plan to address HIV/AIDS nationwide and pledged to promote HIV/AIDS testing and awareness among their congregations (AP/Silive.com, 10/9). Ministers also committed to collaborate with CBC on a proposed bill, titled the National HIV/AIDS Elimination Act, which they are working to introduce in Congress by January, the AP/Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. The legislation calls on the president to declare HIV/AIDS among blacks a public health emergency, which would trigger money and resources to fight the disease, NBLCA President Debra Fraser-Howze said (Hajela, AP/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 10/9).

Bishop T.D. Jakes of the Dallas-based Potter's House church, who is co-chairing the meeting, said the conference also will "scrutinize" 2008 presidential candidates to ensure that preventing HIV/AIDS in the black community is on their agendas. "We will support only those candidates who have this as a primary interest item on their agendas as well," Jakes said (AP/Silive.com, 10/9). He added, "Our focus right now is saving lives. Tomorrow we can save souls" (AP/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 10/9). According to the Rev. Calvin Butts -- senior pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, who is co-chairing the meeting -- the perception that black churches have not been involved with the fight against HIV/AIDS is incorrect. "The clergy has always been involved," he said, adding, "Not enough people have paid attention to what the church has actually been doing" (AP/Silive.com, 10/9).

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According to CDC estimates from 2005, blacks made up about 13% of the U.S. population but accounted for 49% of new AIDS diagnoses (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 10/9).

Back to other news for October 2007


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2007 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
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This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
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