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Nationwide Study Seeks Patients to Investigate Whether Women Respond Differently Than Men to HIV Treatment

Spring 2000

Nearly one out of every three new HIV infections occurs in women, according to recent studies. So why do women account for only 9 to 15% of research study participants? And do we know if men and women respond the same way to anti-HIV drug therapies?

A national team of researchers is set to begin working with almost 15 other institutions nationwide in this cutting edge investigational study to examine the difference between men's and women's responses to the protease inhibitors in combination with nucleoside analogues in HIV positive patients.

This study is a critical step forward in better understanding the treatment of HIV/AIDS in women. Women are a challenging group to research because in many cases, they put their families needs before their own, often neglecting their own health.

The women's trial is designed to determine whether gender differences exist in response to anti-HIV treatment, including impact on viral suppression and CD4 cell count. The study will also attempt to begin to answer important questions about absorption, metabolism, and dosages.

Historically, the treatment of HIV/AIDS has not focused on women. This is the fastest-growing population in the AIDS epidemic, yet women are understudied. This team of scientists has put women's research at the forefront of its clinical programs to address the specific treatment needs of women with HIV/AIDS.

The open-label study is expected to enroll 100 women and 100 men in over 15 centers nationwide. Recruitment of volunteers is ongoing.

Be a part of the solution. Help yourself and others. Find out if this study is right for you. For study details and locations please call Ana Rodriguez at 1.800.554.4876


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