Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Policy & Politics

Advocates Discuss U.S. Law Banning HIV-Positive Foreigners From Entering Country

April 20, 2007

Some HIV/AIDS advocates last week at a forum in Washington, D.C., called for changes to a U.S. law that bans HIV-positive foreigners from entering the country, the Bay Area Reporter reports (Roehr, Bay Area Reporter, 4/19). Congress in 1993 enacted legislation that prevented HIV-positive foreigners from obtaining visas or citizenship. According to the U.S. Department of State, if any foreigners traveling to the U.S., including people from countries not requiring visas, reveal that they have a "communicable disease of public health significance," they are prevented from entering the country. The same rules apply to green card applicants (Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, 11/22/06). According to the Reporter, the law can be waived on an individual basis if it is considered in the best interest of the U.S. to do so, and blanket waivers have been issued for specific events. According to J. Stephen Morrison, executive director of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the policy is "misaligned with current realities and evolving U.S. interests." Phillip Nieburg -- senior associate at CSIS' HIV/AIDS Task Force and co-author of a recent CSIS report on the issue -- said there is no public health justification for the law. According to CARE President Helene Gayle, the law is not consistent with the international leadership the U.S. has demonstrated with the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. "It is just one more thing where we are out of line and inconsistent with what we are trying to do," she said. Some critics of the waiver process required for short-term visitors say that many people are not aware of their HIV-positive status when they apply for visas. In addition, visa applicants who are aware of their status likely do not want to disclose that information to state department officials because the officials or support staff could reveal it, and the application fee for the waiver can be unaffordable for people with low incomes, according to the Reporter. The Bush administration has acknowledged the concerns associated with the law, and President Bush on World AIDS Day on Dec. 1, 2006, announced that he would issue an executive order to address such concerns. According to Tom Walsh of the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, the process of issuing the executive order is "underway." He added that the process is "complex" and that he could not give additional details. Some people have said that the delay is because of efforts to work within the boundaries of the law so that new legislation is not needed, according to the Reporter. Some supporters of the law say that HIV-positive foreigners who enter the U.S. as immigrants or short-term visitors might remain in the country and add stress to already overtaxed HIV/AIDS services (Bay Area Reporter, 4/19).

A kaisernetwork.org webcast of the forum, which was sponsored by CSIS and the Kaiser Family Foundation, is available online.

OnlinePOZ in its May issue includes an article about undocumented, HIV-positive immigrants in the U.S. The article is available online.

Back to other news for April 2007

Advertisement


Reprinted with permission from kaisernetwork.org. You can view the entire Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report, search the archives, or sign up for email delivery at www.kaisernetwork.org/dailyreports/hiv. The Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report is published for kaisernetwork.org, a free service of the Kaiser Family Foundation, by The Advisory Board Company. © 2007 by The Advisory Board Company and Kaiser Family Foundation. All rights reserved.



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. It is a part of the publication Kaiser Daily HIV/AIDS Report. Visit the Kaiser Family Foundation's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More on U.S. Immigration Restrictions for People With HIV/AIDS

Tools
 

Advertisement