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Tuberculosis Research & Development: A Critical Analysis

December 2006

TAG interviewed 100 institutions and documented the top 40 investors in TB R&D in 2005. Results highlighted in the report showed that new tools including diagnostics, drugs and vaccines received combined funding of $206 million in 2005 -- diagnostics, $16 million; drugs, $120 million; and vaccines, $70 million. At this rate, only $2 billion will be available over the next decade, whereas the Global Plan to Stop TB 2006-2015 estimates that $9 billion will be needed, revealing a new TB tools funding gap of $7 billion. Basic science and operational research received $94 million and $50 million, respectively, but there are no global targets with which to compare the investments in basic and operational research.

To improve upon decades old technology and match urgency with need, Treatment Action Group demands donors of TB R&D worldwide -- including G8 and developing countries -- increase their investment fivefold, from less than $400 million per year to $2 billion per year, with $1.05 billion directed towards new tools research and $950 million directed towards basic science, infrastructure development, and operational research each year, for a total of $20 billion in TB R&D over the coming decade.

Full report available at www.treatmentactiongroup.org.


Back to the TAGline December 2006 contents page.




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