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Legislative Update--ADAP shortfalls

January 11, 1996

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

As far as we can ascertain, only one state has added saquinavir to their formulary and few states have added 3TC. A number of things are going on that are causing restricted access to HIV drugs:
  1. As yet, there are no definite appropriations from the Feds for FY1996 Ryan White CARE Act. Since most funding for the AIDS Drug Assistance Programs comes from Title II of Ryan White -- with substantial additions from most Title I cities in states lucky enough to have Title I cities -- with VERY little IF ANY money coming from most state funds, States are unwilling to make any changes in their formularies. Unless things radically change (CARE Act programs have been funded under a continuing resolution but only until January 1996), it is unlikely that this situation will change until September 30, 1996. That means that most of the people with HIV who depend upon these programs for their drugs WON'T have access not only to saquinavir, but to ritonavir and indinavir (the Abbott and Merck proteases due to be granted approval late this spring or early this summer), or 3TC while access to non-HIV specific drugs (psychotropics, steroids, analgesics, etc.) will be further pared by most state programs.
  2. In the longer term, Title II programs across the country are going to be majorly strapped for cash EVEN if an appropriations level is decided on. An early estimate developed by the state ADAP directors states that unless Title II receives $150 million in new money, eligibility standards in most states will have to be tightened -- and in many states, they're already ludicrously tight -- and formularies will have to be frozen or pared down with restricted access to multiple antiviral therapy. A group of advocates, government folk, and drug company folk have already started working on this problem and I'll update sci.med.aids and The Body as things develop.


For more information, contact:
Gary Rose
AIDS Action Council
1875 Connecticut Avenue NW #700
Washington DC 20009
202-986-1300 x 3042
202-986-1345 (fax)
202-332-9614 (tty)
E-Mail: aidsaction@aidsaction.org

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by AIDS Action Council.
 
See Also
2014 National ADAP Monitoring Project Annual Report (PDF)
ADAP Waiting List Update: 35 People in 1 State as of July 23
More News on ADAP Funding and Activism

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