Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Expanded Access Program for ABT-378/r Amended

May 2000

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Abbott Laboratories has amended the inclusion criteria for the expanded access program for ABT-378/r (also known by its trade name Aluviran, or by the common name lopinavir).

The new criteria removes any restrictions in CD4 count or viral load. Any person infected with HIV in need of ABT-378/r now may be eligible to receive the drug through the expanded access program.

All individuals enrolled in the program will continue to receive ABT-378/r until it is commercially available to consumers.


Experimental P.I.

ABT-378/r is an experimental protease inhibitor formulated with a small amount of Norvir (ritonavir) to increase bioavailabilty, the amount of a drug which reaches the bloodstream. The small "r" at the end of the drug's name means it also includes Norvir.

Advertisement
ABT-378/r is usually dosed in adults as three capsules twice a day (BID) with food. For those individuals taking Sustiva, Abbott has increased the dose of ABT-378/r to four capsules twice a day due to drug-drug interactions.

Because ABT-378/r is combined with Norvir, all other drug interactions with Norvir apply.


Change Many at Same Time

According to the Department of Health and Human Services, changes made to an antiretroviral regimen should include switching to as many new medications as possible.

Many people wishing to receive ABT-378/r may have developed resistance to some or all currently approved antiretroviral medications. If a new regimen cannot be constructed with currently approved medications, one option is to wait until a new regimen can be constructed using experimental medications. Medications which are or may soon be available in other expanded access programs include the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir (PMPA) or the fusion inhibitor T-20.

Your ability to receive ABT-378/r may depend on any program agreements that exist between your health care provider and Abbott. Check with your health care provider for details about the program.

For more information about the ABT-378/r Expanded Access Program, call (888) 711-7193.

John Slovick is a treatment advocate in AIDS Project Los Angeles' Client Health Education and Advocacy Program. He can be reached by calling (323) 993-1526 or by e-mail at jslovick@APLA.org.


This article has been reprinted at The Body with the permission of AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA).

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by AIDS Project Los Angeles. It is a part of the publication Positive Living.
 
See Also
More on HIV Medications
More Research on Kaletra (Lopinavir/Ritonavir)

Tools
 

Advertisement