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The Resource Train
Six Stress-Reducing Principles for People With Chronic Conditions

By Elizabeth E. Lehmann

November 2000

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1) Get Emotional Support -- Find a support group, a physician that is personable, psychotherapy, an organization that promotes activities for persons living with HIV. The goal here is to feel connected with others who have the understanding and compassion for what you're confronting.

2) Listen to Self-Help Tapes -- Listen to tapes that are calming, offer a meditation, or uses guided imagery. Many people find that these tapes are soothing and offer a time for centering. Dr. Emmett Miller offers a catalogue of tapes. You may call 1-800-52-TAPES for more information.

3) Try Meditation -- There are many types of meditation. Many people find that this is an effective way of quieting and centering. People can meditate in morning and in the evening. They find that this is a nice and calming way to begin and end each day. There are many books available at your local bookstore on this topic.

4) Connect with Nature -- Nature is all around us. Take a walk in the park or a trail at Stone Mountain. Being around mother earth's beauty is sometimes all we need to keep things in perspective. Just sit and watch!

5) Get Enough Vitamins and Nutrients -- Eating balanced meals with additional vitamins is recommended as a stress reducer. Many vitamins help eliminate and fight toxins in our body. Talk with your physician about what vitamins he or she would recommend, or call AIDS Treatment Initiatives at 404-659-2437.

6) Establish a Bedtime Routine -- This is a technique that I enjoy. It helps me "settle down" from the day. I typically take a bubble bath, drink some herbal tea, and then read my book before I go to bed. This helps me relax and sleep better. It is important to get enough rest.




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