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Clinical Trials: Philadelphia Hospitals Combine to Form "Supersite" and Reduce Delays

By John S. James

September 15, 2004

Five major academic medical centers in Philadelphia are forming a "supersite" known as the Integrated Research Group, so that pharmaceutical companies can conduct clinical trials at all of them with only one contract and one IRB (Institutional Review Board) to deal with. The purpose of this state-funded project is to attract business to the area by reducing the paperwork and delays in clinical trials, making Philadelphia more attractive to pharmaceutical companies.

For more information, see "Med Centers Form 'Supersite,'" Philadelphia Business Journal August 6-12, 2004, http://philadelphia.bizjournals.com/philadelphia/ (search for "supersite" -- with a date range including early August 2004).


Comment

This kind of organization might also work in other localities to speed clinical trials by facilitating enrollment and reducing administrative burdens. Officials like it because it expands the economy, companies like it because they can approve their drugs faster by avoiding unnecessary delays in conducting trials, and patients benefit because they can get new treatments sooner (mainly due to the faster approvals).


ISSN # 1052-4207

Copyright 2004 by John S. James. Permission granted for noncommercial reproduction, provided that our address and phone number are included if more than short quotations are used.


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