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News and Notes

December 1998

Sustiva Pricing | Rwandan Women and HIV | Hemophilia Relief Fund


The High Cost of Fighting HIV

DuPont has priced its anti-HIV drug Sustiva, recently approved by the FDA, at almost $5,000 per year, almost twice as much as Rescriptor or Viramune, the other two drugs of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) class. "DuPont didn't do a study comparing its drug to the other NNRTIs, which cost half as much. There is no data or rationale supporting ... [its] outrageous price" said Joyce Hamilton of ACT UP. "At this price, thousands of people with HIV will not be able to get this drug. Like most people with HIV, I depend on public programs to get the drugs that keep me alive. DuPont's price gouging means that Sustiva either won't be covered, or it will bankrupt programs like Medicaid or ADAP." There are over 100 groups, including ACT UP Philadelphia, that have signed onto the "Fair Pricing Consensus Statement," demanding that Sustiva be priced similarly to other NNRTIs.


Rwandan Women and HIV

The November 15 New York Times shared with its readers the results of a decade-old HIV study of pregnant women in Rwanda.

According to this study, a pregnant woman whose husband was a farmer had a 9 percent chance of being infected, while the chance rose to 22 percent if he was a soldier, 32 percent if he was a white-collar worker, and 38 percent if the woman was married to a government official.

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Hemophilia Relief Fund

"This is a great day for the bleeding disorders community. After years of effort, the federal government has finally recognized the tragedy that has afflicted the bleeding disorders community." So said National Hemophelia Foundation President Katherine Muir in response to President Clinton signing into law legislation that establishes a $750 million trust fund for individuals who contracted HIV from contaminated clotting factor. The law allows a one-time compassionate payment of $100,000 per individual. The legal spouse, parents, or children of someone who has died are also entitled to compensation. The U.S. is one of the last developed countries to establish such a compensation program, which already exists in more than 26 other countries.


Back to the December 1998 Issue of Body Positive Magazine.



  
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This article was provided by Body Positive. It is a part of the publication Body Positive.
 

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