Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Pesticides Found in Many Ginseng Supplements in the U.S.

July 23, 2001

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The organization ConsumerLab in the U.S. conducts independent testing of supplements sold in that country. The purpose of the testing is to find out if the ingredients listed on the label match those found in the capsules, tablets or liquids that accompany the label. The company produces reports which are available on its website at www.consumerlab.com.

In a recent study, ConsumerLab tested 22 brands of ginseng supplements sold in the U.S. and found that only nine passed its review. Unfortunately, the company only lists the brands that pass its testing. They found that eight of 12 products that were labelled to contain "Korean ginseng" were contaminated with pesticides (hexachlorobenzene and/or quintozene). These compounds may damage the liver and kidneys and have the potential to cause cancer in people. In some cases the level of contamination by pesticides was 20 times higher than allowed under U.S. and European guidelines. For further details about the review of ginseng supplements readers can visit www.consumerlab.com/results/ginseng.asp. General safety information about ginseng is also available from the site. These results on contamination point to the need for similar research on products available in Canada.


Reference

  1. Anonymous. Pesticide contamination found in many ginseng supplements tested by consumerlab.com: only 9 of 22 products pass product review published online today. Press release 11 July, 2001.

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by Canadian AIDS Treatment Information Exchange. Visit CATIE's Web site to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 
See Also
More on Chinese Herbs and HIV/AIDS
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement