Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Possible Sexual, Injecting-Drug-Use, or Other Nonoccupational Exposure to HIV, Including Considerations Related to Antiretroviral Therapy

September 25, 1998

Therapy After Nonoccupational HIV Exposure


Health-care providers may want to provide their patients with a system for promptly initiating evaluation, counseling, and follow-up services after a reported sexual, injecting-drug-use, or other nonoccupational HIV exposure that might put a patient at high risk for acquiring infection. Sexual exposure also can put a patient at risk for other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancy. Injecting-drug- use exposure through shared injection equipment can put a patient at risk for acquiring other viral infections (e.g., hepatitis B and hepatitis C). All persons evaluated for possible nonoccupational HIV exposure should be counseled to initiate, resume, or improve risk-reduction behaviors to avoid future exposure and to prevent possible secondary transmission until their current HIV infection status is determined.


Back | Next
Table of Contents




  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a part of the publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Visit the CDC's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 

Tools
 

Advertisement