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Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Possible Sexual, Injecting-Drug-Use, or Other Nonoccupational Exposure to HIV, Including Considerations Related to Antiretroviral Therapy

September 25, 1998

Conclusion


Because of the lack of efficacy data for the use of antiretroviral agents to reduce HIV transmission after a possible nonoccupational exposure, PHS is unable to recommend for or against this therapeutic approach. If such therapy is attempted, health-care providers must a) inform patients of the lack of data; b) select antiretroviral agents carefully and monitor their side effects and toxicities closely; c) address their patients' underlying risk-reduction needs (when applicable); and d) restrict the use of this therapy to high-risk exposures (e.g., unprotected receptive anal or vaginal intercourse with a known HIV-positive person). Research is needed to establish if and under what circumstances antiretroviral therapy following nonoccupational HIV exposure is effective.


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This article was provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a part of the publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Visit the CDC's website to find out more about their activities, publications and services.
 

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