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U.S. News

New CDC Funding Emphasizes Accountability

December 12, 2003

CDC has announced $49 million in HIV prevention grants that require grantees to prove their programs are effective and focus more on HIV-infected persons. According to the Dec. 3 announcement, CDC expects to issue some 160 grants from $100,000 to $500,000. The grants will run for five years; $49 million is the first year's funding.

Applicants must incorporate 13 indicators of whether or not the funded program is doing what it claims. "For example, let's say one of your activities is outreach and testing," said Dr. Harold Jaffe, director of CDC's National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention. "One indictor might be the percent of newly identified positive tests that were returned to a client."

Such grants have traditionally measured performance in units of service, such as how many people took part in a counseling program. That could still be an indicator, but CDC also wants to know how many contacts were required to get one person into counseling, and whether the person completed the counseling. "There is more of an expectation for accountability in HIV prevention, to say we really need to see what you're accomplishing," Jaffe said.

Funded groups will use their first year's dollars to establish a baseline and set annual targets and goals for the five years. To cover start-up costs, first-year awards will be larger. Groups that do not meet their targets may see their grants cut or eliminated. The grants are also designed to fund prevention for positives programs encouraging HIV-positive people to alter their behavior so as not to transmit the virus to others.

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Mark McLaurin, associate director for prevention policy at Gay Men's Health Crisis, said the response of most AIDS groups was generally positive. "While this represents another hill to climb, we welcome this step. It represents the first opportunity that we have to demonstrate that prevention does indeed work," he said.

Back to other news for December 12, 2003

Adapted from:
Gay City News
12.04.03; Duncan Osborne



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 


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