Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

National News

Ugandan's Key to White House: AIDS

June 11, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

The White House used President Bush's Tuesday meeting with Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni to showcase a central part of Bush's agenda -- the $15 billion global AIDS bill that Congress approved last month. Bush is hoping to use the bill to highlight what his advisers say is the human side of his administration's foreign policy.

Bush praised Museveni for his "extraordinary leadership on HIV/AIDS." Administration officials say Uganda's ability to turn around its AIDS epidemic -- 5 percent of Ugandans now have AIDS, compared to 15 percent a decade ago -- served as inspiration for Bush's AIDS bill by persuading him that AIDS money could be well spent in Africa. It is not clear whether Bush will stop in Uganda on his trip to Africa next month.

The bill was largely based on Uganda's ABC campaign, which promotes abstinence, being faithful, and condoms. In the United States, the ABC approach has been politically palatable to Bush's conservative base because of its emphasis on abstinence. "It doesn't use the distribution of condoms as the first line of defense," said Ken Connor, director of the anti-abortion Family Research Council.

Privately, Bush pressed Museveni on Uganda's role as a weapons supplier to militias in Congo's five-year-old civil war, according to senior administration officials. The armies of neighboring countries and their proxy militias have run rampant through Congo, and the fighting, massacres, famine and disease have caused an estimated 3.3 million deaths. Although Ugandan troops pulled out of Congo last month under a negotiated peace agreement, Uganda has still been supporting militias and political groups in the region. According to an official, Bush was adamant that Museveni disengage. Museveni told the president "we're out and we're done with it," said the official, who took Museveni's remarks to mean he would no longer support Congolese militias.

Back to other CDC news for June 11, 2003

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
New York Times
06.11.03; Elisabeth Bumiller

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More News and Reports on U.S. Global HIV/AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)
Advertisement:
Find out how a Walgreens specially trained pharmacist can help you

Tools
 

Advertisement