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Local and Community News

Los Angeles AIDS Charities Getting More Creative About Fundraising

June 2, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

With its confluence of wealth, celebrity and media, Los Angeles is a fundraiser's dream. But a sluggish economy has slowed charitable donations significantly, resulting in nonprofits getting more creative about fundraising. And among the most innovative are L.A.'s HIV/AIDS service organizations, primarily because there are 160 of them competing for funds.

Gone are the traditional black-tie dinners, say nonprofit event planners. Themed parties, shopping sprees and sports challenges provide local HIV/AIDS nonprofits a way to boost the fun factor for donors, in the hopes that donors will give again the next year. "We're constantly trying to be creative to be accessible to more people and consequently raise more funds," said AIDS Project Los Angeles Executive Director Craig E. Thompson. "There's just more need every year... We now have 52,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles County," double the number from 10 years ago.

Project Angel Food has earned name recognition for its shopping spree, Divine Design, which allows donors to buy costly goods at cut-rate prices. Although the event raises 40 percent of the project's $1.6 million annual budget, the group co-hosts an additional 12 fund-raisers each year to maintain donor enthusiasm for the cause. These events boost the agency's visibility, acknowledges Brian Kilpatrick, PAF's special events coordinator.

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation's annual fund-raiser is a carnival. The nonprofit routinely raises around $1.5 million of its $20 million annual operating budget at the one-day event.

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"People's attention spans are getting smaller and smaller. And things sometimes have to be more flashy," noted Kilpatrick.

Back to other CDC news for June 2, 2003

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Los Angeles Times
05.25.03; Gina Piccalo

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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