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Life Expectancy in United States Reaches a Record High

March 17, 2003

The average lifespan for Americans has reached an all-time high, rising from 77 years in 2000 to 77.2 in 2001, CDC reported Friday. The increase was for both men and women and for both whites and blacks. For men, life expectancy increased from 74.3 years in 2000 to 74.4 years in 2001. For women, it increased from 79.7 years to 79.8. For whites overall, the increase was one-tenth of a year, to 77.7 years in 2001; for blacks it was three-tenths of a year, to 72.2. The age-adjusted death rate from HIV/AIDS declined nearly 4 percent, continuing a trend that started in 1995. Over a six-year period, deaths from HIV dropped nearly 70 percent, largely because of the introduction of new, more powerful drug combinations. HIV, however, remains the sixth-leading cause of death for people ages 24-44. "People with HIV are living longer, no question about it, and that is something we're very pleased about," said CDC Director Julie Gerberding. "However, much remains unclear. What is the long-term efficacy of anti-AIDS drugs, for example? Also, since new HIV infections continue to occur, we must remain focused on HIV prevention and keep positive trends in perspective."

Back to other CDC news for March 17, 2003

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Adapted from:
New York Times
03.15.03; Rob Stein


  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
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