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National News

Colorado State University Team Gets $3 Million to Study Vaccines for TB

March 20, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Researchers at Colorado State University and around the world have been working to develop more effective, longer lasting tuberculosis vaccines. BCG, the vaccine used to inoculate people against the disease, was developed in the 1920s. "It seems to protect children well, but it doesn't work [as well] for adults," said CSU microbiology professor Ian Orme. Out of about 240 vaccine candidates, Orme said about half a dozen have been proven effective in short-term studies. CSU researchers now will examine their long-term effectiveness and safety in a pioneering study funded by a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

"The unique feature of this study is that it combines our knowledge of the molecular biology of tuberculosis with the pathology of the body's cellular response," said pathology associate professor Randy Basaraba, who along with Orme is leading the project.

The research team's goals are to determine precisely how TB vaccines affect lung pathology; determine how the effectiveness and safety of the vaccines changes over the long term; and determine if when the vaccine is given affects lung pathology, effectiveness and safety. Candidate vaccines include those made by mutating the TB bacteria as well as vaccines made from proteins and DNA.

CSU has become a leading center for TB research, in large part due to Orme's efforts. His TB-related work has brought more than $50 million in research support to CSU and led to several scientific breakthroughs. "We're probably one of the few places in the world that can do this, so we get [vaccine candidates] sent in from all over the world," Orme said. "I'm becoming more and more optimistic that we will find something that works. What we have now is promising."

Back to other CDC news for March 20, 2003

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Fort Collins Coloradoan
03.11.03; Rahaf Kalaaji

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
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This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
Tuberculosis (TB) Fact Sheet
Questions and Answers About Tuberculosis
More Research on Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS
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