Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

International News

Australia: Gel May Be Sexual Disease Barrier

March 21, 2003

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!

Human trials on a vaginal gel that may prevent transmission of HIV and other STDs could begin in Melbourne within months after successful animal trials.

Chief Executive John Raff of Starpharma, the Melbourne-based company that developed the gel, said the gel had also proved successful in preventing transmission of genital herpes and chlamydia. The gel, which is applied in the vagina before sex, works by preventing the fusion of the virus with cells in the body.

Raff said microbicides are the primary strategy for preventing the spread of HIV, as vaccine trials to date had proved unsuccessful. The next phase would involve further tests on monkeys to examine the minimum dosage required and the effects of repeat doses.

Mike Kennedy, executive director of the Victorian AIDS Council, said microbicides are particularly important for preventing HIV transmission because they give control to women so they do not have to rely on their partners to use a condom. "It shifts the capacity to control HIV infection to the one who is likely to be affected by penetrative sex," he said.

Advertisement
Raff said Starpharma is looking at adapting the gel so that it could be used anally. He hoped that human trials would begin in Melbourne and the United States later this year.

Andrew Grulich, president of the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine, cautioned that the road from animal to human trials and then to market is a long one, and researchers do not know how successful the products will be in humans. However, he said the results are promising.

Back to other CDC news for March 21, 2003

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Age (Melbourne)
03.20.03; Amanda Dunn

A note from TheBody.com: Since this article was written, the HIV pandemic has changed, as has our understanding of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. As a result, parts of this article may be outdated. Please keep this in mind, and be sure to visit other parts of our site for more recent information!



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 
See Also
More News and Research on Microbicides

Tools
 

Advertisement