Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

News Briefs

Study: Alabama's Blacks Have Higher Death Rate Than Whites

March 5, 2003

Black people in Alabama have higher death rates than whites for illnesses that include AIDS, prostate cancer and diabetes, according to a study from the state Department of Health. The study, which covered 1998 to 2000, found the death rate for AIDS was seven times higher among blacks than whites. The report also found deep racial disparities in the life expectancy of Alabama residents. White people tend to live more than three years longer than black people, or 75.5 years compared to 72.2 years. Blacks also had about double the death rates of white people for prostate cancer, diabetes, septicemia and kidney disease, according to the study. Many of the disparities may be due to poor access to health care, a problem that is much worse in rural parts of Alabama, said Gwin Lipscomb of the health department's minority health office. Kathryn Chapman, a health analyst for the department, said the study will be published in the Alabama Atlas of Racial Disparities in Mortality, which will issue the first comprehensive comparison of death rates between races in the state.

Back to other CDC news for March 5, 2003

Previous Updates

Adapted from:
Associated Press
03.04.03



  
  • Email Email
  • Printable Single-Page Print-Friendly
  • Glossary Glossary

This article was provided by CDC National Prevention Information Network. It is a part of the publication CDC HIV/Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update.
 

Tools
 

Advertisement